By KatieKohler

kkohler@myspiritnews.com

Charles Sampson, a 61 year-old Chester man of the 200 block of West 21st St., was arrested Friday for the Nov. 30th attempted robbery of the Chester Post Office.

Sampson’s arrest came just days after the announcement of a reward of up to $25,000 for information leading to the suspect’s arrest and conviction was published in The Spirit.

Sampson, charged with attempted robbery, is in federal custody and was scheduled for an initial appearance and detention hearing before a federal magistrate in Philadelphia Monday afternoon, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service (USPIS) said.

According to an affidavit of probable cause, Sampson, went into the Chester Post Office, at 400 Edgemont Ave., at about 12:49 p.m. Nov. 30 wearing a mask and carrying a long golf-style umbrella, which was open in an effort to conceal his identity. He pointed a firearm at, and demanded cash from, the employee at the counter, the affidavit says. Later in the affidavit, Sampson admitted that he wore a ski mask and displayed a “fake gun” which looked real.

The investigation has been a collaboration between the Chester City Police Department and the USPIS.

“There aren’t a lot of assets (at a post office) so it doesn’t make sense. Number one, he shouldn’t be robbing the post office in the first place. It’s a federal offense,” said Reginald L. Wade Jr., U.S. postal inspector during a phone interview last week.

“It (post offices being robbed) doesn’t happen very often,” said Wade.

According to court documents, Sampson has a criminal record dating back to 1974 with over 30 cases including arrests for assault and robbery. In court documents, he is also referred to as Charles Jones and Charles Jackson. In May 1993 Sampson pled guilty to a 1992 robbery and was sentenced 10 to 20 years in prison. He served 18 years, was released in March 2011, and is on state parole until 2022.

Charles Samson caught for robbing the Chester’s Post office.

Charles Samson caught for robbing the Chester’s Post office.

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